Design patterns

Design patterns are evidence-based solutions to common design problems.

Following patterns means you:

  • Avoid repeating work that’s already been done;
  • Avoid making mistakes that others have already learned from;
  • Build on the research and experience of teams across government;
  • Make your service consistent with other government services.

Current design patterns

Use the following Government of Yukon-specific patterns as you build your service:

We will continue to add more design patterns as we create, test and approve them.

Other design patterns

Government of Yukon makes use of the Web Experience Toolkit as the foundation for its transactional services. Read about the plugins and styles as well the design features.


Data collection notice

Why use this pattern

If your service collects personal information from an individual, either directly or indirectly, you must ensure that the individual is informed of:

  • The purpose for which the information is being collected;
  • The legal authority for collecting it, and;
  • The title, business address and business telephone number of an officer or employee who can answer questions about the collection.

Example

Your personal information is being collected under the authority of section number of the name of act and name of another act. It will be used for the administration and enforcement of the Act and Regulations.

For further information on the collection of your information, contact:

Position title, Department name
P.O. Box Number, Whitehorse, Yukon, Postal code
Telephone: 000-000-0000


Email receipt message

Why use this pattern

If your service sends an email message to an individual after they submit a request or order, the email should only tell the individual what they need to know, and nothing more.

Never include personal or sensitive information.

An email receipt message typically includes the following components:

What they need to do

This is what will happen next. Don’t explain the whole process, just focus on the simple facts:

  • If the individual needs to do something after receiving the email, make it clear.
  • If the individual needs to do something by a specific date, tell them when it must happen.

What they should expect

If your service requires that the individual wait for the government to send them something, such as a vehicle registration or birth certificate tell them when they should expect it.

For example, “You’ll get your vehicle registration in 5-10 business days.”

If a payment was made, what they ordered

If your service takes payment, such as for a fishing licence or camping permit tell them what they ordered and how much they paid.

Who to contact if they need help

An individual may need to contact the government about their order or request. Make it easy for them by providing an email address and/or telephone number. You can also include a transaction order number or request number, if available.

Who it came from

The name of the service should be in the subject line. This will mean more to the individual than your department name or acronym.

Example

Subject line: Order confirmation: Renew a vehicle registration

This message is to confirm your vehicle registration renewal(s) has been received by Government of Yukon.

What you need to do

You don’t need to do anything right now.

What will happen next

The decal for your licence plate(s) and registration will be mailed to the address you gave us. Please allow for up to 5-10 business days to receive the decal for your licence plate(s) and registration through regular mail.

Details of your order

3 vehicle registration renewal(s)
Total paid: $30.00

If you need help

Email eservices@gov.yk.ca or telephone 000-000-0000 if assistance is required. Refer to confirmation number ABC123.

Government email accounts

Email messages must always be sent from government email accounts that are regularly checked by staff and individuals can reply to if they have questions or need help. Do not use noreply @gov yk ca or other types of “no reply” email accounts.

Last update:
Oct 23, 2017